Party Togel Online Gaming records 6.5% slide in operating profit

 

 

Online gambling group Party Gaming has released its first half results, showing a 6.5% fall in operating profit, which management has attributed to competitive pressures and the consumer slowdown.

 

However, the group offered the more encouraging news that trade in the last three weeks had been strong. In the three weeks to August 18, the average gross daily revenue was $1.9 million, whilst average active poker players totalled 51,000 per day.

 

The group posted an H1,2009 operating profit of $60.7 million on revenues down 21% at $201.3 million for the six months to the end of June.

 

Management recapped on its non-prosecution agreement with U.S. authorities, which confirmed Party Gaming would not be prosecuted for its activities prior to the passing of the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act in October 2006.

 

As part of the agreement Party Gaming said it would pay U.S. authorities $105 million over a 42-month period, which resulted in a first-half pretax loss of $66.9 million compared with a profit of $22.7 million in the same period last year.

 

Utah Cracks Down On Online Gambling

 

Police in the small Utah city of Murray raided an Internet cafe on Sunday evening and arrested over 50 people on allegations that they were conducting and participating in illegal online Togel Online gambling activities.

 

The Murray City Police Department revealed that it had conducted several undercover operations at The Fortune Cyber Cafe in the Salt Lake City suburb since spring in cooperation of the Salt Lake County District Attorneys Office and stated that customers were playing various online slot games alongside poker and keno.

 

Following the raid, police formally charged six employees while issuing 45 others with citations. Ironically, the owner of the location was not arrested or charged.

 

This cafe was allegedly operating a scheme that saw customers purchase Internet time before being issued with a card that they could then insert into a computer. Winning players were then allowed to cash in these cards and take their spoils home with them as cash.

 

“[We want to] keep customers out of their business and let [customers] realise that if they do go to a business like this, they will be arrested for it,” Kenny Bass, Detective for the Murray City Police Department, told local television station Fox 13.